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The 17th Amendment Dismantling the Republic

The 17th Amendment: Dismantling the Republic

 

From the time of the founding, segments of the American citizenry advocated pure democracy. Yet the Founders gave us a republic in which the people, the state governments and the executive branch each had a voice in the legislative process.  Thus, members of the Senate were not originally elected by the people, nor did they represent the interests of the people in their respective s . . .

john dewey

John Dewey Envisions a Manufactured Will of the Populous

 

John Dewey, sometimes referred to as the “modern father of experimental education,” espoused some interesting philosophies which are employed in our modern-day educational systems and texts.

He saw education as the preferred method of socialization, a process, “continually shaping the individual’s powers, saturating his consciousness, forming his habits, training his ideas . . .

Religions of the Founders

Religions of the Founders

In recent years, there has arisen a picture depicting most of the Founding Fathers as deists.  This belief, while unsupported by the evidence available in their writings and speeches, supports a historical point of view which attempts to remove Judeo-Christian principles from American culture.  With the exception of three of the Founders, all were adherents of a Ch . . .

Wall of Seperation

Jefferson and the Fabled “Wall of Separation”

 

Thomas Jefferson, one the three deist leaning Founders, is credited by society as having defined a complete separation between church and state in the United States.  The fabled “wall of separation” attributed to him is just that; a fable.

In his letter to the Danbury Baptist Association, Jefferson reiterated the Con . . .

Importance of God and Religion

Washington on the Importance of God and Religion

Like most of the Founding Fathers, George Washington saw the importance of religion as a necessary component of human happiness, a healthy society and sustained good governance. Washington’s views were largely due to his own beliefs regarding both religion and governance.

Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to pol . . .